ACT Information

The more you know about the ACT, the higher you will score. Learn everything you need to know about the ACT here!

Just How Important is Your ACT Score?

Colleges say that ACT scores are only one small part of what they look at in the college admissions process. However, while that may be true, there’s also a very good chance that ACT scores are much more important to colleges than they’re willing to admit.

Why Colleges Won’t Admit Just How Important ACT Scores Are in the Admissions Process

It’s good PR for colleges to say that they are more interested in the “whole” student than in how well a student performs on a standardized test such as the ACT, especially in an age where standardized tests are so vehemently attacked by many.


So, if a college says that it doesn’t view ACT scores as a really important factor in its admissions process, you can’t really trust what it’s saying because that’s what colleges are supposed to say. Colleges have a very strong motivation to say that many other factors are equally as important as a student’s ACT score.

Most people have a negative view of standardized tests and of placing too much value on a standardized test score. Colleges recognize this, and so, for PR purposes, they will downplay the importance of ACT scores in their admissions process.

However, it’s almost certain that ACT scores are actually much more important than a college will admit…

Why ACT Scores are Important to Colleges

The reason why ACT scores are almost certainly more important to colleges than they’ll admit is because ACT scores are the best way for colleges to compare students fairly who come from very different schools. Since no two schools are alike, it’s almost impossible for colleges to compare students by the grades they get in high school or their GPA.

The ACT is unique in that every student who takes it takes the exact same test in the exact same way. And because of this, colleges can know far more about a student’s academic ability from his or her ACT score than from his or her grades in high school.

It’s very possible for a student to get good grades in high school simply because he or she had easy teachers or easy classes, yet get a low score on the ACT. However, the ACT is designed so that it’s almost impossible to beat the system and get a higher score than you are academically capable of. You simply need to have a certain amount of reading and math ability to get a good score on the ACT.

If colleges are looking at two students, one who scored a 31 on the ACT and one who scored a 22 on the ACT, it is almost certain that the student who scored the 31 will be preferred over the student who scored a 22, even if the student who scored a 22 has great extra-curricular achievements. Colleges will prefer the student with a higher ACT score for at least two reasons: 1) Higher ACT scores are a clearer indicator of truly being ready for college, and 2) Admitting students with higher ACT scores demonstrates more clearly that the college has a high standard, which results in a better reputation for the college.


Colleges want to be able to say they are selecting the best students from among applicants, and it will take a very, very good reason for a college to select a student with a far lower ACT score over a student with a higher ACT score, simply because most other factors in the admissions process are less tangible than ACT scores.

How We Know that ACT Scores are Important to Colleges

One way we can know for certain that ACT scores are important to colleges is the prevalence of merit-based scholarships. Most competitive colleges provide scholarships to students that are based on the student’s ACT/SAT score alone. For colleges, ACT scores are a reliable way to measure a student’s academic achievement, and they choose to reward students for getting certain ACT scores.

If ACT scores were not important in the admissions process, colleges would choose another standard by which to award merit-based scholarships. However, the fact that merit-based scholarships are based on ACT/SAT test scores shows that colleges see these standardized test scores as the most reliable and fair way to compare different students and judge their readiness for college.

By |March 23rd, 2014|ACT Information|0 Comments

The Incredibly Predictable Format of the ACT




 
 
In this post, we’re going to talk about just how predictable the ACT is and how you can take advantage of its predictability. The good news about the ACT is that it’s incredibly predictable—almost everything about it stays exactly the same every single year: the number of questions, the types of questions, the topics of the questions, the number of passages, the types of passages, etc. And, as with most things in life, the more you know about the ACT before you take it, the better you’ll do on it. You’ll be able to have a specific game plan for each test, for how to approach each passage and question, and for how to make the most of the limited time you have. The best way to defeat your enemy is to know everything there is to know about your enemy. So, here is a summary of the incredibly predictable format of the ACT:

Section #1: The English Test

The ACT always begins with the English test, which is 75 questions and 45 minutes long. There’ll be five passages with 15 questions each. About 40 questions will be on Mechanics & Usage, or basically grammar, and about 35 questions will be on Rhetorical Skills, or basically effective writing. We’ll review these different types of questions in other videos. The good news about the English test is that it’s the “easiest” out of all the sections and the least rushed. Most students finish with plenty of time left. The bad news is that since it’s “easier” than the other sections, it’s graded a little more strictly, so you don’t want to make any careless or silly mistakes. A lot of students go through the English test too quickly—they rush through it and make way too many careless mistakes.

Section #2: The Math Test

After the English test is the math test, which is 60 questions and 60 minutes long. The questions generally go from easier to harder, but this isn’t a definite rule—there’ll be some easier questions scattered throughout the test, so make sure you’re able to get through the entire test. On the math test, there’ll be about 14 pre-algebra questions, 10 elementary algebra questions, 9 intermediate algebra questions, 9 coordinate geometry questions, 14 plane geometry questions, and 4 trigonometry questions. The good news for the math test is that although time is more of an issue on the math test than on the English test, if you know your math concepts well, you shouldn’t need to worry too much about time. The bad news is that you need to study and know a lot of math content to do well on this test. But don’t worry, we’ll help you review this content in a later session.

Section #2.5: 10 Minute Break

After the math test, there’ll be a 10-minute break. We recommend that you bring a snack to eat during this break to refuel for the second half. Make sure you use this break to recharge, and don’t let anything that happened during the first half of the test affect your focus for the second half.

Section #3: The Reading Test

After the 10-minute break is the reading test, which is 40 questions and 35 minutes long. The reading test consists of 4 passages with 10 questions each, and the passages always show up in exactly the same order: Prose Fiction, then Social Studies, then Humanities, and then Natural Sciences. The good news for the reading test is that you don’t need to study or know anything beforehand for the reading test because all of the answers are right there in the passages. But, the bad news is that time is a huge issue for the reading test. Most students run out of time and have to guess on a lot of questions, which lowers their score significantly. In previous videos, we’ve already talked about the importance of building up your reading speed and comprehension by reading a lot. In a later session, we’ll also explain the best strategies you can use to make the most of your time and get a good score on the reading test.

Section #4: The Science Test

After the reading test is the science test, which is also 40 questions and 35 minutes long. The science test consists of 7 passages: 3 of them will be Data Representation passages with 5 questions each, 3 of them will be Research Summary passages with 6 questions each, and one of them will be a Conflicting Viewpoints passage with 7 questions. The science test isn’t really a science test. It’s actually really similar to the reading test, just with more passages and more technical information that you need to sort through. Like the reading test, the good news for the science test is that you don’t need to study or know anything beforehand—again, all the answers are right there in the passages. But again, the bad news is that the science test is difficult because of how little time you have to do so many different passages. Again, most students end up not finishing, having to guess on a lot of questions, and getting a pretty low score because of that. Like with the reading test, building up your reading speed and comprehension is the best way to prepare for the science test, but we’ll also explain the best strategies you can use to succeed on the science test in another session.

Section #5 (Optional): The Writing Test

If you signed up for the writing test, there’ll be a five minute break after the science test, followed by the writing test. The writing test is 30 minutes long and you have to write one essay. In this essay, you need to defend a position with a well-organized essay, as well as address potential counterarguments against your position. The ACT is looking for a very specific kind of essay, and we’ll show you how to give the ACT what it’s looking for in other videos.

Final Thoughts

So, this is basically the entire ACT. There’s really nothing about it that should surprise you if you prepare for it the right way. A major key to doing well on the ACT is knowing it well enough to approach it with confidence and with a clear game plan, which we’ll show you how to do in other videos. So, be confident! The ACT is not this wild beast that you can’t understand or handle. It’s actually a super predictable test and you can know everything you need to know about it before you actually take the test.

By |March 21st, 2014|ACT Information, ACT Tips|0 Comments

ACT Format: The Sections and Timing of the ACT Test



The ACT format stays the same every year, so it is important to know beforehand what to expect. The ACT rewards preparation, so make sure you avoid surprises by learning the ACT format before you take the test.

The ACT Format: Section #1 – English Test

ACT format english
The ACT English test is 45 minutes long and contains 75 questions. There are five passages and fifteen questions for each passage. These passages do not differ in difficulty level or content tested.

The questions on the ACT English test fall into one of two categories: 1) Usage and Mechanics, or 2) Rhetorical Skills. Usage and Mechanics questions relate to grammar and the rules of the English language, and Rhetorical Skills questions are about writing effectively.

Generally speaking, students have no trouble finishing the ACT English test in the time frame given for this test.

The ACT Format: Section #2 – Math Test

ACT format math
The ACT Math Test is 60 minutes long and contains 60 questions. The questions at the beginning are generally easier, and the questions at the end are generally harder, although there may be easier and harder questions scattered throughout the test.

The questions on the ACT Math test cover pre-algebra, elementary algebra, intermediate algebra, coordinate geometry, plane geometry, and trigonometry. The ACT math test is designed so that an Algebra 2 student can solve every problem on the test.

Many students have trouble finishing the ACT Math test, although if you know your math concepts well, you should not have too much trouble finishing this test in the 60 minutes time frame.

The ACT Format: 10-minute Break

After the ACT Math Test, there is a 10-minute break before the Reading and Science tests. You may eat a snack during this 10-minute break to help gain energy for the rest of the ACT test.

The ACT Format: Section #3 – Reading Test

ACT format reading
The ACT Reading test is 35 minutes long and contains 40 questions. There are four passages that always appear in the same order: 1) Prose Fiction, 2) Social Studies, 3) Humanities, and 4) Natural Sciences. There are 10 questions for each passage.

The questions on the ACT Reading test fall into one of three categories: 1) Specific Detail, 2) Evaluation, or 3) Main Idea. Specific detail questions are answered by the text directly, Evaluation questions require judgments based off of the text, and Main Idea questions are about the text as a whole.

The ACT Reading test is designed to be difficult to finish. To do well on this test, you must use good test taking strategies and be able to read at a relatively high level and speed.


The ACT Format: Section #4 – Science Test

The ACT Science test is 35 minutes long and contains 40 questions. There are seven passages that appear in random order:
ACT format science

  1. 3 Data Representation passages – 5 questions each
  2. 3 Research Summaries passages – 6 questions each
  3. 1 Conflicting Viewpoints passage – 7 questions

The Data Representation and Research Summaries questions are fact questions that are answered by the passages directly. The Conflicting Viewpoints questions are theory questions that require analysis of the passage.

The ACT Science test is designed to be difficult to finish. To do well on this test, you must use good test taking strategies and be able to read at a relatively high level and speed.

The ACT Format: Section #5 (optional) – Writing Test

ACT format writing
The ACT Writing test is 30 minutes long and requires the writing of one essay. You must choose one of two positions given and defend it effectively in essay form.

To do well on the ACT writing test, you must be able to organize a good five paragraph essay and support your main points using good examples. It is also important to address potential counterarguments to your position.

Learn More about the ACT Format

To learn more about the ACT test format, visit the ACT Test Descriptions page.

By |December 14th, 2013|ACT Information, ACT Tips|0 Comments

How Long is the ACT Test: Total Time of the Test



A common question people have is, “How long is the ACT test?” There are a number of factors to consider when answering this question:

How long is the ACT test with just the English, Math, Reading, and Science tests alone?

If we added up the amount of time you would spend actually taking the ACT test, here is what the breakdown would look like:

Time Actually Taking the ACT

ACT Section Time
ACT English Test 45 minutes
ACT Math Test 60 minutes
ACT Reading Test 35 minutes
ACT Science Test 35 minutes
Total 175 minutes, or 2 hours 55 minutes

how long is the ACT test

As you can see, the amount of time you will actually be taking the ACT English, Math, Reading, and Science tests is 175 minutes, or 2 hours 55 minutes. However, this is not the total time you will be spending at the ACT test center, due to several other factors.

Four of these factors are 1) taking the ACT Writing test, 2) check-in procedures, 3) administering the test, and 4) breaks.

How long is the ACT test with the optional ACT Writing test included?

The optional ACT writing test is 30 minutes, which will make the time you spend actually taking the ACT look like this:

Time Actually Taking the ACT with the ACT Writing Test

ACT Section Time
ACT English Test 45 minutes
ACT Math Test 60 minutes
ACT Reading Test 35 minutes
ACT Science Test 35 minutes
ACT Writing Test 30 minutes
Total 205 minutes, or 3 hours 25 minutes

The total time you will spend taking the ACT with the optional ACT Writing test included is 205 minutes, or 3 hours 25 minutes. However, again, this is not the total amount of time you will be spending at the ACT test center.


How long is the ACT test in terms of actual time spent at the ACT test center?

When you take the ACT, you will stay at the ACT test center longer than the times listed above. This is because in addition to the time spent taking the different ACT tests, time will also be spent checking in, passing out materials, filling out information on the answer sheet, and reading instructions. There is also a 10-minute break between the Math and Reading tests and a 5-minute break between the Science and Writing tests.

Taking into account all of these additional factors, plan to be at the ACT test center a total of about 4 hours 15 minutes for the ACT test without the Writing option, and about 5 hours for the ACT test with the writing option.

If you take the ACT test at 8:00am, expect to leave the test center at about 12:15pm for the ACT test without the Writing option.

If you take the ACT test with the Writing option, expect to leave the test center at about 1:00pm.

Be Prepared Physically and Mentally for the Length of the ACT Test

Person yawning
It may surprise you to learn just how long is the ACT test—four to five hours is a long time to spend taking a test. Because of how long the ACT test is, it is very important that you come prepared both physically and mentally for the test.

Make sure you get enough sleep the night before, make sure you eat a good breakfast the morning of the test, and make sure you are mentally prepared to stay focused throughout the entire time of the ACT test. Losing focus can cause your score to drop, but the positive side is that since most students will experience fatigue during the ACT test, if you come prepared to stay alert and focused throughout the entire test, you will have an advantage over most other students.

Visit the ACT Website’s FAQ for More Information about the ACT

While it is less detailed than our articles, the ACT Newsroom has information about how long is the ACT test, as well as answers to other questions.

By |December 14th, 2013|ACT Information, ACT Tips|0 Comments

What is the ACT Test: An Overview of the ACT



what is the act test

The first question parents and students ask as they begin thinking about the ACT is, “Just what is the ACT test?” This page will help you answer that question.

What is the ACT test?

The ACT is a nonprofit organization that creates and administers the ACT test, which is a “college admissions and placement test.” The ACT test is taken by more than 1.6 million high school students every year.

Why is the ACT such an important test?

When people ask, “What is the ACT test?” they are usually wondering about why it is such an important test. The ACT is an important test in the college admissions process for at least two reasons:

1. The ACT is standardized across the country and world


One answer to the question, “What is the ACT test?” is that it is a standardized test, which means that it is one test given to all test takers in the exact same manner. Because the ACT is standardized, colleges can use ACT scores to compare students from all over the country and world in a manner that is fair. Colleges know exactly what the ACT tests and how the ACT tests it, so colleges can trust that the ACT takes place in a predictable, controlled environment.

In contrast, a student’s grades in high school, GPA, and class rank are heavily dependent upon the school the student goes to. Just because a student received good grades in high school does not necessarily mean that he or she is ready for college—it is possible that the student simply had easy teachers, had an easy curriculum, or any number of other factors that colleges cannot control.

Generally speaking, colleges place more value upon a student’s ACT scores because they know what the score means.

2. The ACT is an indicator of college readiness

Although there are many criticisms directed towards the ACT (some of them justified), the ACT is a definite indicator of a student’s college readiness, whereas, again, just because a student performed well in high school does not necessarily mean he or she is ready for the rigor of college.

Doing well on the ACT requires a certain level of academic ability, and a certain work ethic to prepare effectively for it, so that a student’s ACT score can give colleges a good sense of whether this student is ready or not for the rigor of college classes.

A low ACT score likely means that the student’s reading level and problem solving abilities are not very high, or that the student did not take preparing for the ACT seriously. The ACT actually does give colleges a better picture of a student’s college readiness than some would like to admit.

How does ACT scoring work?

ACT score

Many people who ask, “What is the ACT test?” want to know how ACT scoring works and what ACT scores mean.

ACT scores range from 1 to 36. The average ACT score is about a 21. Getting a little more than 50% on the ACT will result in a score of about 21, and getting about 75% of the questions right will result in a score of about 26. Depending on which college you want to attend, you may need to aim for a certain ACT score.

For more information about ACT scoring, visit one of these pages:

What is a Good ACT Score: Average ACT Scores for Colleges

ACT Score Chart: Raw Score, Scale Score, and Percentile


What is the ACT Test Format?

There are four sections on the ACT: English, Math, Reading, and Science. There is also an optional writing test.

The English test is a 45 minute test that contains 75 questions (5 passages).

The Math test is a 60 minute test that contains 60 questions (that go generally from easier to harder).

The Reading test is a 35 minute test that contains 40 questions (4 passages).

The Science test is a 35 minute test that contains 40 questions (7 passages).

The Writing test is optional and takes 30 minutes.

For more information about “What is the ACT test format?” visit this page:

ACT Format: The Sections and Timing of the ACT Test

For more information about “What is the ACT test’s true length?” visit this page:

How Long is the ACT Test?

When can I take the ACT?

Calendar
The ACT is administered six times each year: September, October, December, February, April, and June. The December, April, and June dates are slightly different because you can request a Test Information Release (TIR) form to check over your answers. This is an extremely helpful feature because it will allow you to determine the types of questions you missed, so you can work to fix the areas you struggled with.

You may send your ACT score to up to four colleges when you take the test, although this may not be a good idea if you want to only send your best score to colleges. Generally speaking, it is better to submit scores yourself.

To learn more about the ACT test dates, visit this page:

ACT Testing Dates 2013-2014

Next Steps

Now that you can answer the question, “What is the ACT test?” feel free to explore the rest of Best ACT Prep for more information about the ACT.

By |December 12th, 2013|ACT Information, ACT Tips|0 Comments

ACT Raw Score Conversion Chart: ACT Scale Score from Raw Score



This ACT raw score conversion chart converts your ACT raw score into a scale score for each section of the ACT. Find out what score you would get on the ACT for each section of the ACT.

ACT scoring is not a very simple process. There are raw scores, scale scores, a composite score, and percentiles. It can be difficult to figure out what all of these numbers mean, but have no fear! This article is designed to help you sort through these elements of ACT scoring.

ACT Score Chart: Comparing ACT Raw Score, ACT Scale Score, and ACT Percentile

Note: This is a sample ACT score chart from one ACT test. The ACT score chart will look slightly different for each ACT test.


English
Raw Score
Mathematics
Raw Score
Reading
Raw Score
Science
Raw Score
Scale Score Percentile
75 60 40 40 36 99
73-74 59 39 39 35 99
71-72 58 38 34 99
70 56-57 37 38 33 99
69 55 36 37 32 98
67-68 54 35 31 97
66 52-53 34 36 30 95
65 50-51 32-33 35 29 93
63-64 48-49 31 33-34 28 90
62 45-47 30 32 27 87
60-61 42-44 29 30-31 26 83
58-59 40-41 27-28 28-29 25 79
56-57 37-39 26 26-27 24 74
54-55 35-36 24-25 25 23 68
52-53 33-34 23 23-24 22 62
49-51 31-32 22 21-22 21 (average) 55
46-48 29-30 20-21 19-20 20 49
43-45 26-28 19 18 19 42
41-42 24-25 18 16-17 18 35
39-40 21-23 16-17 15 17 28
36-38 17-20 15 14 16 22
33-35 14-16 14 13 15 17
30-32 11-13 12-13 12 14 11
28-29 9-10 11 11 13 7
26-27 7-8 9-10 10 12 3
24-25 6 8 9 11 1
22-23 5 6-7 7-8 10 1
20-21 4 6 9 1
17-19 3 5 5 8 1
14-16 4 4 7 1
11-13 2 3 3 6 1
8-10 5 1
6-7 1 2 2 4 1
4-5 1 3 1
3 1 2 1
0-2 0 0 0 1 1

ACT Score Chart in Other Formats (JPG and PDF)

ACT Score Chart (JPG)

ACT Score Chart

ACT Score Chart (PDF)

ACT Score Chart (PDF)

ACT Score Chart: What is a Raw Score?

The raw score refers to how many questions you get correct on a particular section of the ACT. This is basically the way that grading normally works in high school—there is a one-to-one correlation between number of questions correct and raw score.

  • For the ACT English test, the raw score is the total number of questions correct out of 75 questions.
  • For the ACT Math Test, the raw score is the total number of questions correct out of 60 questions.
  • For the ACT Reading Test, the raw score is the total number of questions correct out of 40 questions.
  • For the ACT Science Test, the raw score is the total number of questions correct out of 40 questions.

The tricky part of ACT scoring is that your raw scores do not translate into a percentage or a grade, but rather into scale scores for each of the ACT sections.

ACT Score Chart: What is a Scale Score?

ACT score chart
The scale score refers to the ACT score that each raw score corresponds to. ACT scale scores range from 1 to 36. However, the conversion from raw score to scale score is not very intuitive. Generally speaking:

  • Getting 90% of the questions correct corresponds to a score of 31.
  • Getting 75% of the questions correct corresponds to a score of 26.
  • Getting 63% of the questions correct corresponds to a score of 23.
  • Getting 53% of the questions correct corresponds to a score of 20.
  • Getting 43% of the questions correct corresponds to a score of 17.

The interesting thing about ACT scale scores is that a score of 23 is considered a relatively good ACT score, and you can score a 23 by answering just 63% of the questions correct! However, in high school, a 63% is not a good grade.

The reason for this discrepancy is that the standards for the ACT are completely different from the standards for high school. You can actually be proud of yourself for getting a “D” on the ACT!

ACT Score Chart: What is a Composite Score?

An ACT composite score is simply the average of the four scale scores (English, Math, Reading, and Science).

For example, in the example above, the average of the four scale scores is (20 + 17 + 20 + 16) / 4 = 18.25. The ACT rounds to the nearest whole number, so this would result in a composite ACT score of 18.

ACT Score Chart: What is ACT Percentile?

The ACT percentile means that this ACT score is equal to or better than that percentage of students. For example, being in the 80th percentile means that your ACT score is equal to or better than 80% of students who took the ACT. Generally speaking, here is a breakdown of how ACT scores correspond to percentiles.

  • An ACT score of 31 is in the 97th percentile of all students.
  • An ACT score of 26 is in the 83rd percentile of all students.
  • An ACT score of 23 is in the 68th percentile of all students.
  • An ACT score of 20 is in the 49th percentile of all students.
  • An ACT score of 17 is in the 28th percentile of all students.

Again, getting a score of 23 on the ACT and being in the 68th percentile of all students is considered a relatively good position to be in for the college admissions process.

By |November 26th, 2013|ACT Information|0 Comments

What is a Good ACT Score: Average ACT Scores for Colleges



There is no easy answer to the question, “What is a good ACT Score?” This is because different colleges have different requirements for students’ ACT scores in the admissions process. Thus, the specific ACT score you aim for will depend on what college(s) you will apply to.
what is a good act score

What is a Good ACT Score: The National Average ACT Score

According to the ACT, the national average ACT score is 21.1. A score of 21 corresponds to getting a little more than half of the questions on the ACT correct. Although 21 was the national average ACT score, 21 would probably be considered a relatively low score for most colleges. This is because the national average ACT score includes every student who takes the ACT, and many students receive extremely low scores.

If you want to be competitive in the college admissions process, it is highly recommended that you aim for higher than a 21. A score of 21 puts you in the 55th percentile of all ACT test-takers. Nevertheless, a score of 21 on the ACT will qualify you for many colleges. For a better idea of what is a good ACT score, take a look at the chart below that compares ACT scores to percentile.


What is a Good ACT Score: Comparing ACT Scores to Percentile (ACT Score Chart)

ACT Score Percentile
31 97th Percentile
26 83rd Percentile
23 68th Percentile
20 49th Percentile
17 28th Percentile

As you can see, a score of 31 or above is an excellent ACT score that puts you in the 97th percentile of all ACT test takers, a score of 26 is a good ACT score that puts you in the 83rd percentile, and a score of 23 is a pretty good ACT score that puts you in the 68th percentile.

What is a Good ACT Score: Average ACT Scores for the Top 5 Colleges

Below you can compare the average ACT scores for top colleges across the United States. The range of scores from the 25th percentile to the 75th percentile represent the average ACT scores for the middle 50% of students who were admitted to the college.

As you can see from this chart, your ACT score must be excellent (at least a 31) to have a good chance of being admitted to one of the top 5 colleges in the US. Fortunately, not all colleges have such high ACT score requirements (see the chart below this one), and most students do not go to such prestigious universities.

College 25th Percentile ACT Score 75h Percentile ACT Score
1. Princeton University 31 35
2. Harvard University 32 35
3. Yale University 31 35
4. Columbia University 32 35
5. Stanford University 31 34


What is a Good ACT Score: Average ACT Scores for Other Good Colleges

college building

There are many great colleges that do not require such high ACT scores. See the chart below to get a feel for what kinds of ACT scores colleges are looking for.

Although there are obviously countless colleges not in this list, hopefully this chart will you a general idea of what is a good ACT score and what ACT scores different colleges are looking for.

To find out ACT score information for colleges not on this list, you can simply Google “(college name) act scores”. The average ACT scores for colleges is public information that you can find easily yourself.

College 25th Percentile ACT Score 75h Percentile ACT Score
Colorado State University 22 27
Florida State University 25 29
Indiana University 24 29
Johns Hopkins 30 33
UC Berkeley 27 32
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) 26 31
University of Southern California 29 33
University of Wisconsin 26 30

How do I get a good ACT score?

Now that you know what is a good ACT score, you might be wondering what you need to do to get a good ACT score. To learn more about preparing for the ACT, check out these major sections of our articles:

ACT Study Guide: Content and Concepts to Know for the ACT

Go here for information about how to prepare for each individual section of the ACT.

ACT Strategies: Tricks to Master the ACT

Go here for the best test taking strategies to use for each individual section of the ACT, as well as some general tips for the ACT.

ACT Practice Test Page: Links to ACT Practice Tests

Go here for the largest collection of free ACT practice tests, as well as suggestions for how to effective use each practice test.

By |November 26th, 2013|ACT Information|0 Comments